Main Page / Login Option Forums General Myopia & Astigmatism Discussion Getting my program all straightened out

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    Andrea
    Participant
    Post count: 46

    Hello,

    I’m in the midst of getting my eyes straightened out again as I restart this program. So I have some questions to help me get back on track.

    Background: I recently checked out fine at my retina doctor, but haven’t been seen by a regular optometrist for several years. I self estimated my current-7R, -6.75L full prescription, and this has worked well for a few years now. For decades, the R lens is historically 0.25 diopter stronger than L, however, recently, my L eye is slightly more blurry (see my earlier posts–I think you are right that it is related to strain and artificial focal planes).

    So here are my questions:

    * I have about 10 pairs of Zennis in decreasing diopters. They are all pretty scratched, chipped, and generally beat up, and I’ve lost my full prescription pair (-7 R, -6.75L). So the “full” prescription pair I’m currently using is 0.25 diopters weaker than that. I would like to order some new pairs of Zennis. Should I go ahead and get seen by a regular eye doc for an updated, baseline prescription, before I order my new Zennis? Should I wait to let my eyes settle back into the program first?

    * I’ve returned to cm measurements, but I moved (houses) since I did it last. I’m dismayed to see I’ve dropped from a baseline of 17cm to about 16cm, but I think the place in my house where I’m measuring has lower light. Also, we’re in October, and the weather in coastal Southern California is alternating between overcast and sunny, unlike when I was last measuring. So I guess I should find the sunniest possible location in my house for my AM measurements, and just re-establish a baseline there?

    * If you look way back in my post history, I kind of intuited myself into this thing where I’m doing distance looking without any glasses (an old Bates technique; I continue it because it really feels like it relaxes my eyes and improves my peripheral vision and my cm measurements). And I can voluntarily focus on things in the distance, and they do come in relatively really clear. (still a lot of blur compared to someone with normal vision, but substantially better.) I can actually subtly feel the distance focus happening in my eyes when I do it. Now, when I asked you, you said you don’t know what this thing is that I’m doing, but keep doing it because it can only be helpful. The clear effect always goes away when I blink. I’m starting to think that what’s happening is I’m clearing double vision, but I think maybe I haven’t ever really figured out active focus, either pushing or pulling. So I need to really focus on getting the active focus going, not just only do this long distance, double vision clearing thing I’m doing. Right? And the easiest way to start that is by pushing (near distance)?

    * I am a therapist who sits indoors and carefully observes/attends to my clients throughout my work day. Because of the high demand on my visual system I’ve recently switched to using my full prescription for this work. Otherwise I just experience a lot of eye strain and distraction. Interestingly, my eye strain increases when the session becomes more intense. I am currently working on improving the lighting in my office. Do you have any suggestions regarding this?

    * People in their late 40s and early 50s still have enough neuroplasticity to improve their vision, right?

    As always, thank you for your guidance!

    May 2015:
    Full prescription -7 R, -6.75 L no astigmatism
    Normalized: -6.5 R, -6.25 L
    For near work: -5.5 R, -5.25 L

    [{"date":"2016-05-09","left":"19","right":"19","both":"19"},{"date":"2016-05-14","left":"20.5","right":"20.5","both":"20.5"},{"date":"2016-05-14","left":"20.5","right":"20.5","both":"20.5"}]
    see full history
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    • Jake S.
      Keymaster
      Post count: 8757

      Answers below.

      * I have about 10 pairs of Zennis in decreasing diopters. They are all pretty scratched, chipped, and generally beat up, and I’ve lost my full prescription pair (-7 R, -6.75L). So the “full” prescription pair I’m currently using is 0.25 diopters weaker than that. I would like to order some new pairs of Zennis. Should I go ahead and get seen by a regular eye doc for an updated, baseline prescription, before I order my new Zennis? Should I wait to let my eyes settle back into the program first?

      Think of focal plane changes like special credits. Every focal plane change causes a challenge for the visual cortex to adapt. It will only respond well to one or two at most every few months. Choose them wisely! So if the current correction is comfortable, gets you to around 20/30 or better, perhaps it’s worth not changing it until you have a specific purpose to do so.

      Regular eye exam, not necessary – entirely up to you if you feel it’s necessary, or whether you’re comfortable with your self measuring work.

      * I’ve returned to cm measurements, but I moved (houses) since I did it last. I’m dismayed to see I’ve dropped from a baseline of 17cm to about 16cm, but I think the place in my house where I’m measuring has lower light. Also, we’re in October, and the weather in coastal Southern California is alternating between overcast and sunny, unlike when I was last measuring. So I guess I should find the sunniest possible location in my house for my AM measurements, and just re-establish a baseline there?

      –> Yes light will always have a noticeable affect. A nice shaded full daylight spot will give you the best results with the least focal plane error.

      * If you look way back in my post history, I kind of intuited myself into this thing where I’m doing distance looking without any glasses (an old Bates technique; I continue it because it really feels like it relaxes my eyes and improves my peripheral vision and my cm measurements). And I can voluntarily focus on things in the distance, and they do come in relatively really clear. (still a lot of blur compared to someone with normal vision, but substantially better.) I can actually subtly feel the distance focus happening in my eyes when I do it. Now, when I asked you, you said you don’t know what this thing is that I’m doing, but keep doing it because it can only be helpful. The clear effect always goes away when I blink. I’m starting to think that what’s happening is I’m clearing double vision, but I think maybe I haven’t ever really figured out active focus, either pushing or pulling. So I need to really focus on getting the active focus going, not just only do this long distance, double vision clearing thing I’m doing. Right? And the easiest way to start that is by pushing (near distance)?

      –>. Yes. Near distance, where everything is static. Lighting, the screen, and something you do over extended periods consistently over time. Best for habit building and just a quick blink, clear up text a bit. The distance activity you describe is nice too, keep it up. Most productive is the active focus that clears some blur and is easy to access.

      * I am a therapist who sits indoors and carefully observes/attends to my clients throughout my work day. Because of the high demand on my visual system I’ve recently switched to using my full prescription for this work. Otherwise I just experience a lot of eye strain and distraction. Interestingly, my eye strain increases when the session becomes more intense. I am currently working on improving the lighting in my office. Do you have any suggestions regarding this?

      –> Light is key. Here again if your normalized is around 20/30 outdoor, it should likely work well in indoor situations as long as there is natural light. There’s no one correct answer here, ideal would be to have some focus challenge that is easily resolved with active focus. That way you’re always slightly challenging your vision – finding that sweet spot does take a bit of discovery.

      * People in their late 40s and early 50s still have enough neuroplasticity to improve their vision, right?

      –> Absolutely. I’ve had students in their 80s and even 90s improve multiple diopters.

    • Andrea
      Participant
      Post count: 46

      Hi Jake,

      Your response above is really helpful! Thank you.

      You know, one of my former Bates-ish coaches (kinda morphed it into their own method) said something helpful. It was that if you pay attention to your eyes, they can show you better ways of living. The beginning of increase in blur, did indeed stimulate me to slow my life down a bit, and take better care of my eyes.

      Several days ago, I switched back to “full” (-6.75/-6/5) prescription for all driving (day or night), for seeing clients, and for watching TV at night (there’s just too much blur with the normalized). I stopped staring at my phone or iPad nearly so much (only a few minutes at a time, a few times a day). I improved the lighting in my office, and resumed daily relaxation/distance looking in the mornings. Now, after only a few days, the normalized are more comfortable, and I can use them to see clients, at least thus far today. It might be a different story by the end of the day, but we’ll see.

      The reason I wondered whether I should see a normal eye doctor and get a baseline prescription is that left eye suddenly being more blurry than the right. It does seem to be clearing up though.

      Is there any “feeling” in your eyes when you do the active focus? or is it just simply a steady clearing up of text, that remains when you blink?

      🙂

      May 2015:
      Full prescription -7 R, -6.75 L no astigmatism
      Normalized: -6.5 R, -6.25 L
      For near work: -5.5 R, -5.25 L

      [{"date":"2016-05-09","left":"19","right":"19","both":"19"},{"date":"2016-05-14","left":"20.5","right":"20.5","both":"20.5"},{"date":"2016-05-14","left":"20.5","right":"20.5","both":"20.5"}]
      see full history
    • Jake S.
      Keymaster
      Post count: 8757

      You’ll notice variations in clarity as you’re working on improving your eyesight. Anything that goes on for a few weeks is just something to observe, not necessarily respond to. If it’s only myopia / clarity and nothing more serious, then it’s all good. Most optometrists will just reach straight for more minus and make you doubt where you’re at.

      Nothing against optometrist visits and measurements in general, however.

      Active focus experiences vary for each individual. For me it’s just clearer image. Locked ciliary however definitely has a sensation though, discomfort in the eyeball (for me).

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